Welcome to Silver Lining June (an invitation)

Here’s an invitation to all of you poets (or potential poets, which is all of you) out there to join me in Silver Lining June. This is a collaborative project for the blogging and writing community to create together.

Back in April I ran a challenge called “Golden Shovel April”, which called upon the community to create a Golden Shovel poem based on the prompts provided. It was a fabulous success and a number of the participants asked me to continue. However, I want to provide a little variety and so I’m going to run a new challenge based on the “Silver Lining” form — which is a variation on the Golden Shovel that I came up with earlier this year.

What is the Silver Lining form, you ask? It’s a miner variation on the Golden Shovel form that I “invented” earlier this year. It offers a little more flexibility. Here are the “rules”:


Silver Lining “Rules”

1) Take a line (or lines) from an existing poem (I provide this in the prompt section below)

2) Use each KEY word in the line (or lines) as an end word in your poem. You can skip words like “the”, “and”, “or” etc. that are less core to the meaning of the line. This is the key difference between the Silver Lining vs. the Golden Shovel.

3) Keep the end words in order.

4) The new poem does not have to be about the same subject as the poem that offers the end words.

5) Make sure to credit the poet who originally wrote the line (or lines) and link to my prompt post.

6. Have fun! If the rules are too rigid for what your muse is calling for then break them!


Silver Lining Example:

Prompt: “Cursing the winter solstice sun” (from Under the Solstice Sun by Monty Vern)

New Silver Lining poem (note that it excludes the “the” from the prompt line)

Fallen Sun

She cursing
Anger burning through cold winter
Sharp winds whipping away solstice
Me, her fallen sun.


Silver Lining June Prompts

Choose one, two, or all three and create your own Silver Lining poem for each prompt you select.

June Prompt No. 1

A molten gold flows away from the sun.”

from “Evening Sea Wind” by Carl Sandburg

June Prompt No. 2

“It is in the smell of an avocado blossom, and in the true passion of a kiss.”

from “The Unnamable River” by Arthur Sze

June Prompt No. 3

The day is done, and the darkness

Falls from the wings of Night,

As a feather is wafted downward

From an eagle in his flight.“

from “The Day is Done” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Additional Guidelines

(1) You can either post on your own blog and link to this prompt post so that we can all see it and further share, include it in this post’s comments section, or post on twitter and tag me (@montyvern).

(2) While there is not any hard deadline, the intention is to share your poem(s) during the prompt month (feel free to post each poem separately if you decide to do more then one). If you post prior to the end of the month, then I will try to include your submission (along with mine) in a monthly round-up post for us all to enjoy. If you’ve posted on your own site then I will include an excerpt with link. If you post either in the comments or twitter I will include the entire poem with credit to the author.

(3) While there is absolutely no requirement, I highly encourage you to tag one or two potential poets in your post and invite them to join. Let’s grow our creative community!


If you missed the Golden Shovels created by the community in the April challenge, check out all the contributions in the Golden Shovel April Round-Up. Feel free to give these prompts a try as well. They were great poem line prompts with lots of creative potential.

That’s it. Time to get poetic! Enjoy!



Be well,

Monty

Welcome to Golden Shovel April (an invitation)

Here’s an invitation to all of you poets (or potential poets, which is all of you) out there to join me in Golden Shovel April. This is a collaborative project for the blogging and writing community to create together.

Back in February I ran a weekly prompt challenge called “Get Your Golden Shovel”, which called upon the community to create a Golden Shovel poem based on the prompt line provided. It was a fabulous success and a number of the participants asked me to continue with the challenge. However, I wanted to provide a little more flexibility (both in terms of prompt and in terms of time), so I’m making an adjustment as and launching this as a monthly collaborative project with up to three prompts to choose from. And since April is #PoetryMonth, when better to launch than now?

What is the Golden Shovel form, you ask? The Golden Shovel form was created by the poet Terrance Hayes, whose poem “Golden Shovel” (from his 2010 collection Lighthead) is based on Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” which references the phrase “Golden Shovel”. Here are the “rules”:


Golden Shovel “Rules”

1) Take a line (or lines) from an existing poem (I provide this in the prompt section below)

2) Use each word in the line (or lines) as an end word in your poem.

3) Keep the end words in order.

4) The new poem does not have to be about the same subject as the poem that offers the end words.

5) Make sure to credit the poet who originally wrote the line (or lines) and link to my prompt post.

6. Have fun! If the rules are too rigid for what your muse is calling for then break them!


Golden Shovel Example:

Prompt: “Cursing the winter solstice sun” (from Under the Solstice Sun by Monty Vern)

New Golden Shovel poem:

Winter’s Curse

Honey sweet lips cursing;

Stoking flames, melting the

Frozen timepieces of winter;

Summoning summer’s solstice;

Accelerating earth ‘round the sun.


Golden Shovel April Prompts

Choose one, two, or all three and create your own Golden Shovel poem for each prompt you select.

April Prompt No. 1

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep”

from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost

April Prompt No. 2

…feel the wet maples leaves flicker in the rain”

from “The Leaves of a Dream are the Leaves of an Onion” by Arthur Sze

April Prompt No. 3

Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or fester like a sore – and then run?.”

from “Dream Deferred” (Harlem) by Langston Hughes

Additional Guidelines

(1) You can either post on your own blog and link to this prompt post so that we can all see it and further share, include it in this post’s comments section, or post on twitter and tag me (@montyvern).

(2) While there is not any hard deadline, the intention is to share your Golden Shovel poem(s) during the prompt month (feel free to post each poem separately if you decide to do more then one). If you post prior to the 25th of the month, then I will try to include your submission (along with mine) in a monthly round-up post for us all to enjoy. If you’ve posted on your own site then I will include an excerpt with link. If you post either in the comments or twitter I will include the entire poem with credit to the author.

(3) While there is absolutely no requirement, I highly encourage you to tag one or two potential poets in your post and invite them to join. Let’s grow our creative community!


If you missed the original Golden Shovels created by the community in the February challenge, check out all the contributions in the Week 1 Round-Up, Week 2 Round-Up, Week 3 Round-Up, and Week 4 Round-Up. Feel free to give these prompts a try as well. They were great poem line prompts with lots of creative potential.

That’s it. Time to get poetic! Enjoy!



Be well,

Monty

Get Your Golden Shovel! No. 04 (a collaborative series)

This is an invitation to all of you poets (or potential poets, which is all of you) out there to join me in a collaborative series I’m calling “Get Your Golden Shovel”. Here is how it works.

Each Saturday in February (as an initial experiment and then I’ll decide whether to continue), will be Golden Shovel Saturday. I’ll post a prompt consisting of one or two lines from a well known poem on Saturday, then we all will create a new poem using the Golden Shovel form and share it with each other. I think it will be very interesting to see how different each of our pieces are despite pulling from the same source of material.

What is the Golden Shovel form, you ask? The Golden Shovel form was created by the poet Terrance Hayes, whose poem “Golden Shovel” (from his 2010 collection Lighthead) is based on Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” which references the phrase “Golden Shovel”. Check out the “rules” here. There is also an example provided.

If you missed the earlier prompts, check out all the contributions from the community in the Week 1 Round-Up, Week 2 Round-Up, and Week 3 Round-Up. Feel free to contribute yours anytime. They were great poem line prompts with lots of creative potential.

Here’s our fourth (and final, for now) prompt. Enjoy!


Golden Shovel No. 04

The sky is blue, or the rain falls with its spills of pearl.”

from “Spring” by Mary Oliver

You can either post on your own blog and link to the prompt post so that we can all see it and further share, include it in the prompt post’s comments section, or post on twitter and tag me (@montyvern).

While there is not any hard deadline, the intention is to share your Golden Shovel poem during the prompt week before the following Golden Shovel Saturday. I’ll target posting my own poem along with some of yours with links in a round-up post ahead of the following week’s prompt.

That’s it! I’m looking forward to seeing what we all come up. It should be a bit challenging, but hopefully fun.

In this weeks round-up, I’ll share my thoughts on the future of the “Get Your Golden Shovel” collaboration.

Be well,

Monty

Get Your Golden Shovel! No. 03 (a collaborative series)

This is an invitation to all of you poets (or potential poets, which is all of you) out there to join me in a new collaborative series I’m calling “Get Your Golden Shovel”. Here is how it works.

Each Saturday in February (as an initial experiment and then I’ll decide whether to continue), will be Golden Shovel Saturday. I’ll post a prompt consisting of one or two lines from a well known poem on Saturday, then we all will create a new poem using the Golden Shovel form and share it with each other. I think it will be very interesting to see how different each of our pieces are despite pulling from the same source of material.

What is the Golden Shovel form, you ask? The Golden Shovel form was created by the poet Terrance Hayes, whose poem “Golden Shovel” (from his 2010 collection Lighthead) is based on Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” which references the phrase “Golden Shovel”. Check out the “rules” here. There is also an example provided.

If you missed the earlier prompts, check out all the contributions from the community in the Week 1 Round-Up and Week 2 Round-Up. Feel free to contribute yours anytime. They were great poem line prompts with lots of creative potential.

Here’s our third prompt. Enjoy!


Golden Shovel No. 03

I cannot rub the strangeness from my sight”

After Apple Picking by Robert Frost (1874-1963)

You can either post on your own blog and link to the prompt post so that we can all see it and further share, include it in the prompt post’s comments section, or post on twitter and tag me (@montyvern).

While there is not a hard deadline, the intention is to share your Golden Shovel poem during the prompt week before the following Golden Shovel Saturday. I’ll target posting my own poem along with some of yours with links in a round-up post ahead of the following week’s prompt.

That’s it! I’m looking forward to seeing what we all come up. It should be a bit challenging, but hopefully fun.

Be well,

Monty

Get Your Golden Shovel! No. 02 (a collaborative series)

This is an invitation to all of you poets (or potential poets, which is all of you) out there to join me in a new collaborative series I’m calling “Get Your Golden Shovel”. Here is how it works.

Each Saturday in February (as an initial experiment and then I’ll decide whether to continue), will be Golden Shovel Saturday. I’ll post a prompt consisting of one or two lines from a well known poem on Saturday, then we all will create a new poem using the Golden Shovel form and share it with each other. I think it will be very interesting to see how different each of our pieces are despite pulling from the same source of material.

What is the Golden Shovel form, you ask? The Golden Shovel form was created by the poet Terrance Hayes, whose poem “Golden Shovel” (from his 2010 collection Lighthead) is based on Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” which references the phrase “Golden Shovel”. Check out the “rules” here. There is also an example provided.

If you missed the first prompt, check out all the contributions from the community in the Week 1 Round-Up. Feel free to contribute yours anytime. It was a great poem line prompt with lots of creative potential.

Enough said. Here’s our second prompt. Enjoy!


Golden Shovel No. 02

Cocoa in pods and alligator pears”

The Tropics in New York by Claude McKay

You can either post on your own blog and link to the prompt post so that we can all see it and further share, include it in the prompt post’s comments section, or post on twitter and tag me (@montyvern).

While there is not any hard deadline, the intention is to share your Golden Shovel poem during the prompt week before the following Golden Shovel Saturday. I’ll target posting my own poem along with some of yours with links in a round-up post ahead of the following week’s prompt.

That’s it! I’m looking forward to seeing what we all come up. It should be a bit challenging, but hopefully fun.

Be well,

Monty

Share Your Blog 2022 (A Captain’s Speech Production)

It’s the first Monday of the year, which means it’s time for the 4th annual Share Your Blog event! Yes, we have food and refreshments. We also have …

Share Your Blog 2022

Hi All! First of all thanks Paul for the opportunity and inspiration for community building. I only ‘met’ Paul and started blogging mid-year 2021 so this is my first go around for this annual tradition.


I’m Monty and like to call myself a work-in-progress human being. I’m also an author and illustrator (you can find my work under my full pen name Monty Vern). And at least since last year a personal blogger. I’m originally from Vermont, USA but currently live, work, and create in Shanghai, China.


My Words: My words are as varied as the experiences life has thrown at me. Always personal and emotionally honest. Mostly autobiographical, observational, and free of fake news. Periodically humorous, sometimes intentionally but often not.


My People: My people are those that use human connection to inspire each other’s creativity. Our personal journeys intersect in the most curious and interesting ways. Let’s embrace each other’s differences and celebrate each shared moment.


Join me:

Monty’s Blahg: https://MontysBlahg.com

Author Site: https://Montysscribbles.com

Twitter: @MontyVern


Be well,

Monty