My First A to Z Challenge Reflection (#AtoZ)

Well my first A to Z challenge has come to a close and I must say I’m pretty impressed with what I managed to put together for my theme of Seriously Silly Poetry. Each post included a silly (or sometimes a bit more sweet than silly) poem with a fun illustration.


Three Most Popular Post (by views):

#1: A is for Apples Eating Zebras (56 views)

#2: B is for Butt in the Air (53 views)

#3: I is for Icky (43 views)


Most Overlooked Post (by views):

U is for Upside Down (13 views) – this is worth a look if you missed it!


New Blogs Discovered & Followed (WP)

The Sound of One Hand Typing

Outside Perception

This is Another Story

Musings of a CowCorn

Christina Dankert

This is Another Story

Enchanted Words

Hopes & Dreams


Blogs I Read A to Z:

No Love for Fatties

What Sandra Thinks

The Confusing Middle

MidLife Cat Lady

Martha Reynolds’s Writes


Proudest A to Z Achievement:

I wrote and published a book! Apples Eating Zebras and other seriously silly poetry is a compilation of my A to Z posts (with a lot of editing and some refinement). This 100-page fully illustrated book is fun and beautiful. Check it out!

Up till May 4th I’m running a launch celebration book give-a-way. Check here for a chance to “win”.


Did you enjoy this series? Let me know! I hope that you stick around as I’ve plenty of more content coming up. Best wishes to you all!

Be well,

Monty

Golden Shovel April Round-Up

About a month ago, I posted three Golden Shovel prompts for April as a collaborative project for our writing community. In this round-up, I share my golden shovel poem as well as those that were contributed by the community.

What is the Golden Shovel form, you ask? The Golden Shovel form was created by the poet Terrance Hayes, whose poem “Golden Shovel” (from his 2010 collection Lighthead) is based on Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” which references the phrase “Golden Shovel”. Check out the “rules” here.

I want to give a big thanks to each of you that were willing to give this months challenge a try:

No Love for Fatties

A Different Perspective

Serendippity


Golden Shovel April Prompts

April Prompt No. 1

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep”

from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost

April Prompt No. 2

…feel the wet maples leaves flicker in the rain”

from “The Leaves of a Dream are the Leaves of an Onion” by Arthur Sze

April Prompt No. 3

Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or fester like a sore – and then run?”

from “Dream Deferred” (Harlem) by Langston Hughes

Golden Shovel Poems for

“The woods are lovely, dark, and deep”:

Dear Brother

Dear brother, the

Days we spent trekking through the woods

Are

My brightest childhood memories, lovely

Moments of joy and laughter interrupting the dark

And

Instilling a love, to this day, so deep.

by Monty Vern

Starlight reflecting against the

Leaves lush and green in the woods

Dancing shadows among the branches are

Creating moving pictures so lovely

Tapestry of… [read more]

No Love for Fatties (gigglingfattie)

You tricked me into the

Moon lit night and led me into woods

Asking me what my intentions are

Not waiting for an answer saying lovely

Words and… [read more]

by A Different Perspective (murisopsis)

Hunting the Stag

In the

hart’s woods

there are

long lovely

passages, dark-

leaved and

shadow-deep.

In the

leafy woods

hunters are

biding [read more]

by serendippity

Golden Shovel Poems for

“…feel the wet maples leaves flicker in the rain”:

Amber Rain

Feel

The

Sticky wet

syrup harvested from the local maples.

It leaves

A flicker

Of joy on the lips; Tastebuds dance in

Delight with the

Sweet taste of amber rain.

by Monty Vern

The Tables Complaint

No one considers how I feel,

covered with bits of breakfast: the scrambled egg scraps, the

itch Pop-Tart crumbs, the wet

orange juice spill (bad for my complexion), the maple

syrup smear. Everyone… [read more]

by serendippity

Golden Shovel Poems for

“Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or fester like a sore – and then run?”

Plump Plumb or Puckered Raisin?

Does

It

Feel like this to you? Not wet or dry.

Neither right nor down, Nor left or up.

Not like

A

Plump plumb or puckered raisin?

Neither out nor in,

No warmth of a shining sun

Or

Coolness of a full moon? Do you feel whole? Or, as me, like a hole?

Do you feel dead inside or

Do you feel joy or perhaps pain and fester

Like

A

Sore?

Or, like me, just empty and numb? And,

Deaf and dumb? If not, then

Please teach me how to feel. To love. To dance. To run.

by Monty Vern

Talking to Myself

Yes, it’s a long line and includes the word fester, but does

that mean it’s impossible? I can do it. I want to do it.

I did the other two. My creative juices haven’t run dry

yet; in fact, with all I’ve been posting, I’d say my cup

is overflowing. I just need a sip to start. And it’s not like

I need to write another “Iliad” or “Odyssey,” just a

simple 18-liner. You know, if my brain were a raisin,

I could put it in a bowl and let it soak up the waters of in-

spiration till it was nice and plump. And then squeeze the

poem out drop by drop. Better yet, what if I made the sun

my muse? [read more]

by serendippity

If you missed the original Golden Shovels created by the community in the February challenge, check out all the contributions in the Week 1 Round-Up, Week 2 Round-Up, Week 3 Round-Up, and Week 4 Round-Up. Feel free to give these prompts a try as well. They were great poem line prompts with lots of creative potential.

Thanks again to all of your poetic efforts. Stay tuned for more opportunities to get creative together in the future.



Be well,

Monty

The Farmhouse (Sunday Scribblings)

Peckapalooza over at The Confusing Middle runs a weekly prompt called Sunday Scribblings. This weeks’ theme is storytelling. Check out his post and join in the creativity!

Sunday Scribblings #100 — Farm

We called it “The Farmhouse” when we moved in. In contrast to “The Cottage” where we had moved from. We could have named it “The Crazy House” but it had barns and we didn’t have the foresight. So “The Farmhouse” it was.

We moved in my early elementary school years, but the move was within the same village (Putney, Vermont) so while it involved a new bus route, there was no change in schools. In a village population of around a thousand one school was more than enough. I’d end up being with the essentially the same 20 or so classmates from 1st to 8th grade.

I still remember the day we moved. I was so scared of taking the strange bus (with a different driver and different kids) and not knowing where to get off. My older brother was with me so there wasn’t much chance of getting lost, but that didn’t reassure me. I wasn’t fully confident that my brother wouldn’t send me to the wrong house!

The farmhouse was HUGE. It had twenty plus rooms (including more than one bathroom!) and multiple barns and so many things to explore. I’d later discover an attic rich with cool finds such as a 1909 National Geographic magazine and a huge glass bottle that I used to store coins (when I could find some).

But this was a shared space and some of the areas were off limits. There was one barn that was closed up tight (we of course went in anyway later when nobody was paying attention and discovered a huge stash of drying “herbs”).

originally published in Monty’s Very Short Shorts

Many of the barn stalls were filled with the owners’ storage. But even with these off limit spaces the place felt gigantic compared to the cottage which was basically a carriage house that had been converted to small living space (with an attached bedroom that was sinking in the swamp no less!).

It wasn’t just my mom, my brother, and I that moved in. Her new partner moved in too. And later another family moved in as well. And they were all crazy people. But that’s a story for another time.

The farm was originally a horse farm but no more. The fields attached were leased to the nearby dairy farmer for their dry cows to graze. At one point we had a pig (name Bacon, which you can read about in Monty’s Almanac 202x if your interested), and there were the dogs and cats and rats that are a staple of such places.

One of the barns had been converted into a music studio. After one band almost burned the place down and was kicked out, I got a chance to explore. It was my first time to see Playboy and Hustler magazine which was eye opening. It was the second time finding a huge stash of “herb”.

Well, perhaps a bit random, but these are my thoughts when I think of “farm”. Thanks for stopping by The Farmhouse for a visit.


Be well,

Monty

Saucy Talk (a Paint Chip Poem)

No Love For Fatties invites us to join in on her Paint Chip Poetry by creating our own poem inspired by the paint chip colors of the week. I think this is a really creative and fun idea so I’m giving it a try. Check out her original post and join in too if you feel inspired.

Paint Chip Poetry


Be well,

Monty

Welcome to Golden Shovel April (an invitation)

Here’s an invitation to all of you poets (or potential poets, which is all of you) out there to join me in Golden Shovel April. This is a collaborative project for the blogging and writing community to create together.

Back in February I ran a weekly prompt challenge called “Get Your Golden Shovel”, which called upon the community to create a Golden Shovel poem based on the prompt line provided. It was a fabulous success and a number of the participants asked me to continue with the challenge. However, I wanted to provide a little more flexibility (both in terms of prompt and in terms of time), so I’m making an adjustment as and launching this as a monthly collaborative project with up to three prompts to choose from. And since April is #PoetryMonth, when better to launch than now?

What is the Golden Shovel form, you ask? The Golden Shovel form was created by the poet Terrance Hayes, whose poem “Golden Shovel” (from his 2010 collection Lighthead) is based on Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” which references the phrase “Golden Shovel”. Here are the “rules”:


Golden Shovel “Rules”

1) Take a line (or lines) from an existing poem (I provide this in the prompt section below)

2) Use each word in the line (or lines) as an end word in your poem.

3) Keep the end words in order.

4) The new poem does not have to be about the same subject as the poem that offers the end words.

5) Make sure to credit the poet who originally wrote the line (or lines) and link to my prompt post.

6. Have fun! If the rules are too rigid for what your muse is calling for then break them!


Golden Shovel Example:

Prompt: “Cursing the winter solstice sun” (from Under the Solstice Sun by Monty Vern)

New Golden Shovel poem:

Winter’s Curse

Honey sweet lips cursing;

Stoking flames, melting the

Frozen timepieces of winter;

Summoning summer’s solstice;

Accelerating earth ‘round the sun.


Golden Shovel April Prompts

Choose one, two, or all three and create your own Golden Shovel poem for each prompt you select.

April Prompt No. 1

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep”

from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost

April Prompt No. 2

…feel the wet maples leaves flicker in the rain”

from “The Leaves of a Dream are the Leaves of an Onion” by Arthur Sze

April Prompt No. 3

Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or fester like a sore – and then run?.”

from “Dream Deferred” (Harlem) by Langston Hughes

Additional Guidelines

(1) You can either post on your own blog and link to this prompt post so that we can all see it and further share, include it in this post’s comments section, or post on twitter and tag me (@montyvern).

(2) While there is not any hard deadline, the intention is to share your Golden Shovel poem(s) during the prompt month (feel free to post each poem separately if you decide to do more then one). If you post prior to the 25th of the month, then I will try to include your submission (along with mine) in a monthly round-up post for us all to enjoy. If you’ve posted on your own site then I will include an excerpt with link. If you post either in the comments or twitter I will include the entire poem with credit to the author.

(3) While there is absolutely no requirement, I highly encourage you to tag one or two potential poets in your post and invite them to join. Let’s grow our creative community!


If you missed the original Golden Shovels created by the community in the February challenge, check out all the contributions in the Week 1 Round-Up, Week 2 Round-Up, Week 3 Round-Up, and Week 4 Round-Up. Feel free to give these prompts a try as well. They were great poem line prompts with lots of creative potential.

That’s it. Time to get poetic! Enjoy!



Be well,

Monty

Herb (a Paint Chip Poem)

No Love For Fatties invites us to join in on her Paint Chip Poetry by creating our own poem inspired by the paint chip colors of the week. I think this is a really creative and fun idea so I’m giving it a try. Check out her original post and join in too if you feel inspired.

Paint Chip Poetry


Be well,

Monty

The Silver Lining No. 1 – “My Son”

Earlier this month, I proposed a modified version of The Golden Shovel poetry form: “The Silver Lining” – which I hope takes all the respect and goodness of The Golden Shovel form but provides just a minor twist that allows for more flexibility. You can check out the rules for the form and an example here.

In this post, I share my Silver Lining poem from the prompt I provided. Nobody took me up on the offer to collaborate, so no round-up of poetry from the community this time.


Silver Lining Prompt No. 01

“And the sun readies himself for sleep, drowses backward toward the horizon, and the woods whisper while the wind massages the sprawling arms of leaf-thick maples

from Summer by Ross Gay

My Son by Monty Vern

From “Summer” by Ross Gay

My son, yes, my sun

Readies

Himself

For war, for famine, for a final end of times, or just a restless sleep

He drowses

Under pills prescribed and falls backward

His voice fades away from the phone toward

Somewhere, anywhere, away from our horizon

Did he fall asleep? We ask each other hopefully. Are we, for the moment, out of these unforgiving worried woods?

We listen carefully for a whisper

Of breath while

Imagining his heart beating a gentle wind

Sending messages of care like those massages

He always loved when cuddling as a young child sprawling

Across our bed in our welcoming arms;

All blind to the leaf-thick

Path ahead of tangled roots and branched maples.


Be well,

Monty

Monty’s Never Have I Ever – RESULTS

This was my first foray into blogging games. We all know that Paul over at The Captain’s Speech is the OG in this area and while I didn’t want to impinge on his captaincy, I decided to experiment a bit with a Never Has Monty Ever…quiz. Here are the results!

First of all, thanks to each of the competitors for your participation. I enjoyed reading your guesses and associated commentary. This was not an easy one and you all put in a great effort.


The Competitors:

No Love for Fatties (GF)

MidLife Cat Lady (CL)

The Confusing Middle (CM)


The Rules/Scoring:

1) I provided one “Never Has Monty Ever” question with 26 different possible answers (3 correct answers + 23 incorrect answers) and each competitor had five guesses and were encouraged to provide “entertaining commentary” to earn additional points.

2. Scoring was based on three components: correct answers (30 possible points) + entertaining commentary (50 possible points) + LOL bonus (20 possible points) = 100 total possible points.

Correct answers – 10 points for each correct answer (3 x 10 = 30 possible points)

Entertaining Commentary – Up to 10 points for each answer’s commentary (5 x 10 = 50 possible points)

LOL bonus – 20 points for making me literally LOL (20 possible points)


The Prize

A paperback or e-copy of Monty’s Almanac 202x (winner’s choice) – a prize of questionable value (or US$6.84 per Amazon).


The Game – The Question & Answers

“Never Has Monty Ever Been Paid To”:

(Select five answers. There are a total of three possible correct answers)

A) Sell popcorn

Answer: Incorrect. I HAVE been paid to sell popcorn. During high school, I worked in a movie theater for about three years and my first job was selling concessions – soda, candy, and popcorn. The pay was US$3.25/hour if I recall correctly. Plus access to watch movies free.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

B) Remove a tree stump

Answer: Incorrect. I HAVE been paid to remove a tree stump. This is probably the hardest physical job that I’ve ever had and was part of a landscaping odd-job project. I don’t remember how much I was paid specifically. I just remember distinctly that I didn’t think it was worth it. Removing a tree stump without the right tools is a nightmare. Add the hot summer sun and humidity and its a nightmare I’ll never forget.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

C) Provide security

Answer: Incorrect. I HAVE been paid to provide security. During college part of my financial aid was an on-campus job and I worked as library security for a couple of years. Basically I had to sit next to a revolving door that let ALL the weather in. It was a great job for getting studying done though as no one ever complained about me having a book in front of me while on the job.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

D) Dog-sit

Answer: Incorrect. I HAVE been paid to dog-sit. It was a brief assignment when I was a kid. My mom was house sitting and I got the “dog sitting” assignment. The dog was more like a wolf and quite a handful, but I remember enjoying it.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

E) Jack-hammer a cement floor

Answer: Incorrect. I HAVE been paid to jack-hammer a cement floor. Or perhaps more accurately to TRY and jack-hammer a cement floor. During college summer and winter breaks I worked a construction job. I was just unskilled labor, but because of the nature of the job and certain union rules it actually paid really really well (US$25/hour!!). I think the other guys were just playing a bit of a joke on me when they gave me the task. I did not have the physical mass required to handle the jack-hammer and it was more like me bouncing up and down while scratching the floor a bit vs. any demolition. They eventually put me back on wheel-barrow duty to remove the cement rubble.

Points Awarded: GF – 10

GF – 10 points for entertaining commentary. Excellent points made and it reminded me of how ridiculous I must have looked while trying to use the jack-hammer. This one made me chuckle aloud (see bonus points).

F) Paint a fence

Answer: Correct. Finally a correct answer here. I’ve painted a fence before (or at least stained one) but it was a chore/home-project and never for pay.

Points Awarded: CM – 20

CM – 10 points for a correct answer (the only one of the bunch so congratulations!). Another 10 points for entertaining commentary. I loved the Karate Kid and even enjoy watching Cobra Kai. Unfortunately I did not pick up the martial arts skills despite having put in the (un-paid) time.

G) Demolish a bathroom

Answer: Incorrect. I HAVE been paid to demolish a bathroom. Interesting enough I was hired to wait/buss tables (see “H”) at this catering establishment and after one event of waiting/bussing tables they deemed I was more suited for their bathroom renovation project. I have to say taking a sledgehammer to the bathroom was a lot of fun. Much more fun then trying not to drop the dishes.

Points Awarded: CL – 5

CL – 5 points for entertaining commentary. Honestly this was a very fun project to get paid for. It’s not as “huge” a job as you might think. A sledgehammer goes a long way.

H) Wait/buss tables

Answer: Incorrect. I have been paid to wait/buss tables although it was very short lived (See “G” above). I’m still not sure why I was never asked to wait again.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points

I) Cut the grass

Answer: Incorrect. I earned my allowance by cutting the grass during part of my childhood.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

J) Run a medical plastics extrusion machine

Answer: Incorrect. During one summer in college I had a job at a medical plastics factory (my Dad knew the owner) and I got to run their extrusion machine to experiment with recycling/reusing waste plastic. I studied Chemical Engineering, so it was within my field (though I certainly didn’t know what I was doing). But neither did the other operators in my opinion. One guy almost lost his hand while I was working there on the three-roll mill. It was grisly.

Points Awarded: GF – 5

GF – 5 points for entertaining commentary. Very valid commentary about this requiring specialized skills, but not as entertaining as your other commentary provided.

K) Be a teacher’s assistant

Answer: Incorrect. I was a TA one semester in college (after I finished the library security job). It was very stressful because it was for the Intro to Chemical Engineering course which I, myself, had struggled with. But the professor was very supportive and eventually hired me to do lab research as well (see “L”).

Points Awarded: CL – 5

CL – 5 points for entertaining commentary. I’m not sure anyone can be a TA. It’s actually quite challenging!

L) Do lab research

Answer: Incorrect. In my last summer at college I stayed on campus to do some paid lab research. I was trying to synthesize a specific polymeric structure and I did create something but I never figured out exactly what. I learned that testing and analysis is much harder than the making. I also did lab research multiple times in my later career, but this was my first and most memorable experience.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

M) Be a cashier

Answer: Incorrect. While working at the movie theater in high school I also took shifts as ticket sales/cashier. It got pretty hectic some nights when we had two cashiers per ticket machine trying to get everyone into the theater on time.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

N) Bag groceries

Answer: Correct! I’ve never worked in a supermarket so the only bagging I’ve done is for myself (or once in a while for someone that looked like they needed help).

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.

O) Mix paint

Answer: Incorrect. My first job was working for a Japanese chemical company and they manufactured silica gel which was used as a paint additive (to make paint appear matte finish). As part of our training we had to mix different amounts/types of silica into black paint and then measure the gloss/shine.

Points Awarded: CL – 5

CL – 5 points for entertaining commentary. Most home improvement stores will mix paints to match your desired colors so this isn’t that uncommon although that is not the context that I had my experience.

P) Cook

Answer: Incorrect. I not only sold popcorn at the movie theater but I also popped it. The pop-corn machine was right next to the cashier/ticket station and when we weren’t busy we were charged with doing both ticket sales and popcorn popping. I can see how someone might not think of popping popcorn as “cooking”, but I say it qualifies.

Points Awarded: CM – 5

CM – Admitting that its a stupid answer gets you some points here as I appreciate the humility (after trying unsuccessfully rationalize).

Q) Taste sexual lubricants

Answer: Incorrect. My primary career has been in consumer product development (R&D) and one of my jobs was to develop new, flavored, sexual lubricants. Specifically, I was tasked for creating a His & Hers strawberry and chocolate pairing. The only way to quickly assess the different flavors was to apply a small dab on my forearm and lick it off (much more representative then eating off a sampling spoon). What can I say. I’m dedicated to my work. I tasted A LOT of lubricant during that project. We ended up with a nice, juicy strawberry (more fresh and less sticky sweet vs. the typical products). The chocolate was much harder because the lubricant base formula was a bit sour and it was hard to cover the sourness with a chocolate flavor.

Points Awarded: GF – 10; CL – 10; CM – 10

GF – 10 points for entertaining commentary. GF made me feel thoroughly disgusting for doing my job. Haha.

CL – 10 points for entertaining commentary. Darn! I should have sued the company! Seriously though, these lubricants were all safety cleared and made of edible ingredients (this is not true of all lubricants so make sure to read the label).

CM – 10 points for entertaining commentary. I agree that this would be strange to find listed in the classifieds. I like that you considered that it might be worth it if the pay is good enough (it was).

R) Watch babies bathe

Answer: Incorrect. In addition to sexual lubricants I was responsible for the development of baby personal care products (wash, lotion, etc) and as part of the consumer research we would visit families homes and observe the bathing process. Observational research is one of the most effective ways to learn how a product works (or doesn’t work) in actual use.

Points Awarded: GF – 10; CM – 10

GF – 10 points for entertaining commentary. This time GF made me feel like I’m some type of pervert and should be put on a list. I chuckled at GF’s response. Just to clear the air though, we always did the observations in pairs (usually mixed sex pairs) and always with the parent doing the bathing.

CM – 10 points for entertaining commentary. I enjoyed your getting twisted up in the concept of the baby bathing themselves. It made me feel a little guilty in that perhaps I should have said “watch babies being bathed” to be more accurate. Anyway, 10 points!

S) Clean a movie-theatre

Answer: Correct. Strangely, although I worked at the movie theater I never had the usher/theater cleaner job. This was usually the first position when starting at the theater but I started from concessions and moved up to cashier/ticket sales avoiding the sticky work.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points

T) Distribute newspapers

Answer: Incorrect. I was a paper boy for a little while during high school (before the movie theater job). I hated it because I had to collect the payments from the customers and they did not seem to be inclined to pay. So although I technically was being paid to deliver the newspaper I didn’t make much if any money from it.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points

U) Lick/stamp envelopes

Answer: Incorrect. As a kid my mom sometimes brought me into her office to do some basic mailroom tasks. She worked as an editor at a magazine and they had promotional mailings and that kind of stuff.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points

V) Mix rubber

Answer: Incorrect. This was another part of my professional career when I was developing adhesives for adhesive bandages. We were in the process of transitioning from natural to synthetic rubber adhesives and I ran a number of mixing trials.

Points Awarded: CL – 10

CL – 10 points for entertaining commentary. Excellent point regarding the safety. We wore protective respiratory masks whenever dealing with solvents.

W) Provide voice-over for a video

Answer: Incorrect. This was during my professional career while working in China. They wanted a native English speaker to provide the voice over. The hard part was that many of the words were actually Latin (scientific names for botanicals) and I didn’t know how to pronounce them either. That plus trying to time the voice-over with the original Chinese version made it very difficult.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points

X) Baby-sit

Answer: Incorrect. I baby-sat a few times for the next door neighbors when I was in middle school.

Points Awarded: CM – 5 points

CM – 5 points for entertaining commentary. I’m not sure how not liking a job would eliminate it as an option (if it did, many of the others on this list would also be scratched), but appreciate the consideration that I shouldn’t suffer through an unpleasant job.

Y) Dig a ditch

Answer: Incorrect. My dad was an electrician and hired me once to dig a ditch to run underground lines. This was almost as painful and difficult as removing a tree stump. But it paid better if I remember correctly. I later found out that they have dedicated machines specifically to dig ditches and my dad was just throwing me a job to help me out. Thanks dad (I think).

Points Awarded: GF – 10

GF – 10 points for entertaining commentary. “Ew Gross” to quote her. I probably would have laughed out loud on this one if it hadn’t just come after the tasting lubricants and bathing baby commentary which had me feeling a bit self-conscious.

Z) Give a speech

Answer: Incorrect. As part of my professional career I’ve been tasked to provide several speeches at conferences and media events (e.g. for a new product launch). I’m not comfortable in front of the camera, but I’m glad for the experience.

Points Awarded: No guesses/No points.


LOL Bonus Points Awarded: GF – 20 points CM – 20 points

GF – 20 points for making me chuckle multiple times while also making me feel disgusting and perverted. Bravo.

CM – 20 points for making me laugh out loud with your closing comment about (perhaps) crying in secret. I appreciate how emotional of a journey this can be.


Points Summary & Winner

No Love for Fatties (GF) earned a total of 65 points (45 entertaining commentary + 20 LOL bonus)

MidLife Cat Lady (CL) earned a total of 35 points (35 entertaining commentary)

The Confusing Middle (CM) earned a total of 70 points (10 correct answer + 40 entertaining commentary + 20 LOL bonus)

That was a close competition and clearly it wasn’t an easy quiz!

Congratulations to the Winner: The Confusing Middle

(I’ll be in touch about the logistics of delivering your prize)

Thanks for all who participated in either playing or reading along!


Be well,

Monty

The Storyteller (Sunday Scribblings)

Peckapalooza over at The Confusing Middle runs a weekly prompt called Sunday Scribblings. This weeks’ theme is storytelling. Check out his post and join in the creativity!

Sunday Scribblings #97 – Storytelling

The Storyteller

Let there be light, the storyteller said.

And then there was light.

Let there be love.

Then there were lovers.

And lovers’ families quarreling.

And then death,

Then sorrow,

And grief.

And an uncertain smile.

And a shy laugh.

Let there be rebirth, the storyteller said.

And then there were zombies, walking dead.

And fear,

And horror,

And excitement,

And laughing out loud.

And harsh shushes

And imperfect silence.

As the storyteller fell silent.

“Tell us more,” they begged of the storyteller.

Tell us the meaning of life, and death.

“Tell us!” “Tell us!”, they said.

“Not now”, the storyteller said,

“It’s time to go to bed.”


Be well,

Monty

Lily (a Paint Chip Poem)

No Love For Fatties invites us to join in on her Paint Chip Poetry by creating our own poem inspired by the paint chip colors of the week. I think this is a really creative and fun idea so I’m giving it a try. Check out her original post and join in too if you feel inspired.

Paint Chip Poetry


Be well,

Monty